McCain the Maverick Dictator

October 9, 2008

Not to belabor the point but, John McCain may just be the candidate of fascism. Here are a video of the old POW survivor slipping up and saying what’s really on his mind. First, he offhandedly mentions a sentiment George Bush had laughed off: the aspiration of becoming dictator of the United States. A dictator is “a person exercising absolute power, esp. a ruler who has absolute, unrestricted control in a government without hereditary succession”. Is that why America invaded Iraq? To overthrow a dictator?


John Cusack, a real American Hero

March 30, 2008

Does anyone remember the internet campaign to elect John Cusack for President? You know a movement was real if you bought the t-shirt, right?  “Cusack For Prez” “He made the tough decisions in Grosse Pointe Blank. He couldn’t be bought in Eight Men Out. He’s cooler than John Malkovich. And we like his politics so far.” That was the slogan, but the old website, cusackforpresident.com, is gone. Maybe it’s time to give it another go. Maybe a Cusack/Nader ticket. American needs a healthy 3rd party option. The following is a sample of Mr. Cusack’s political potential…    http://rawstory.com/news/2008/John_Cusack_movie_takes_on_war_0329.html 

John Cusack was on HBO’s Real Time with Bill Maher and spoke about his upcoming film, War. Inc., which according to Cusack focuses on the military-industrial complex.The film, says Cusack, differs from other films inspired by the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan because, it “has a much more absurdist take on [war].”Cusack added, “some things are so vicious if you didn’t look at them through a different lens you couldn’t get out of bed. And certainly the war profiteering, immorality and illegality of this disastrous, free-market Utopian enterprise out there is certainly well-documented.”While explaining that the film shares similar themes as those found in Naomi Klein’s book, The Shock Doctrine, Cusack said, “the very core things that make up our government like wars or interrogation or border patrol, jailing, any of those types of things that you would think would be sacred things that would happen with the state are now being turned into for-profit enterprises. And if you want all these things to be, if you want corporate ethics to be our national interest, then you have the situation we’re in now. But right now, when you think that we’ve out sourced everything to interrogation, which means torture is a cost-plus enterprise, I think you can see a complete spiritual bankruptcy to this whole neo-con movement. It’s a nightmare beyond anything you can really imagine.”Maher asked if these issues were just a result of a neo-conservative movement and Bush administration or evidence of a “rot in America itself that is a lot deeper.”Cusack responded, “Yeah, I do think the issue goes deeper, a lot deeper.”Adding later, “Some of these truths are so horrible you don’t want to think about that, but it’s just — I mean the gig’s up. If guys who are statesmen on CNN are also sitting on the board and are shareholders in some of the most profitable defense contractors in the world and they publicly make the case to go to war, got to war, then create a new market with the war, come back and speak evangelically about free markets that aren’t free, these aren’t particularly subtle fact and the stock prices jump 145% and their companies are awarded $2.3 billion contract. After a while you have to expose and shame and indict and hopefully convict the participants in this illegal immoral ideology.”    

 


“You are a Fascist and a Liar, Mr. Bush” Keith Olbermann

February 17, 2008

American Fascism updated:  


Copyright and the future of creativity

November 7, 2007

As a podcast, new media producer, user generated content provider — however you want to label it — I’ve always felt driven to create a free alternative to the copyright controlled world of Big Media companies, such as Viacom. It has been my intent to entertain without selling anything more than a keyhole view of my life experiences or the vanity of my creative expression. I tend lean toward an ideology of open source culture. It is my belief that money is not the paramount motivational factor that drives an artist to create works of art. The contrary has been the argument of major media companies for the escalating inforcement and strengthing of copyright laws. They say musicians would stop playing music if pirates plundered away all their potential income. Then what of history’s “starving artists”? Why did Van Gogh continue to paint when he could barely afford bread? Why do rock bands continue their cross-country bar gigs in a rickety old van? So that one day the powerful star-makers might give them their lucky breaks; fame and fortune in the courts of the media kings. This is why Van Gogh cut his ear off. The madness of it all. Our culture has become the property of fat landlords and we the peasant serfs of copyright feudalism. Revolution is on the rise. The consumers now have the means of production at their fingertips. This is the modern battle between the proletariat and the bourgeois. Hopefully no blood will be shed. The future of creativity is now. Will it become a complete dystopia? Watch this presentation…
Larry Lessig: How creativity is being strangled by the law
http://www.ted.com/talks/view/id/187

About this Talk

Larry Lessig gets TEDsters to their feet, whooping and whistling, following this elegant presentation of “three stories and an argument.” The Net’s most adored lawyer brings together John Philip Sousa, celestial copyrights, and the “ASCAP cartel” to build a case for creative freedom. He pins down the key shortcomings of our dusty, pre-digital intellectual property laws, and reveals how bad laws beget bad code. Then, in an homage to cutting-edge artistry, he throws in some of the most hilarious remixes you’ve ever seen.

About Larry Lessig

Stanford professor Larry Lessig is one of our foremost authorities on copyright issues. In a time when “content” is not confined to a film canister, Lessig has a vision for reconciling creative freedom with marketplace competition.